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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
which has been around for about 10 years saying that -- getting johnson & jn -- johnson saying we're going to get carcinogens first out of our baby products across the whole world and that's really significant because they found formaldehyde in baby's johnson shampoo a few years ago, they tested it a few yearser later and found that johnson & johnson has taken it out of their products in china and other countries but not in the united states, well, if you can do it in one country, why can't you do it in all of them, doesn't everybody deserve safer baby shampoo no matter where they live? that put a lot of pressure on them because the consumers said we don't want those things in our products and the change happened and now they have a plan with timelines and clear transparent goals to get those chemicals out of their products. it might be a little slower than we'd all like as consumers but it's moving in the right direction and getting one major company to move put a lot of pressure on those other companies if they want to maintain their credibility, so we're seeing safer shampoo pr
virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provide that information to you. so, we are tasked with providing the information. there have been about 300 small businesses that have received the lawsuits. knee individuals who use this mechanism and come up -- the individual to use this mechanism. while it is important to have ada access, but we want you to understand there are in
service. we really appreciate it. [ applause ] >> this is angela johnson. >> good afternoon miss johnson and congratulations and thank you for your great service to the agency and the people of this city. >>> thank you, thank you. i would just like to say that i am just honored to be receiving this award. it caught me by surprise, and honestly, it brought me to tears because i just honestly felt that in the event that somebody saw something happening to me that they would call and try to get help for me. and being that this man was being assaulted and just so brutally, it was just hurtful for me to just watch it as it unfolded. you know, as it began, and i drive the 37 line and i have regular amount of we set to accomplish three gonzales. one, to right side the service while minmizing inconveniences for our customers. two, to reduce overtime and three, reduce fuel and maintenance costs through operating fewer miles. we were encouraged by the results. we were able to provide 97.5% of service during that week. that represents a 3% increase from the same time period the previous year. we re
distribution system that we can tap into. johnson: in the mid-1990s, the water system had just about collapsed. the district had just run into some very dire financial circumstances, and, when those kinds of things happen, the very first thing that goes is maintenance of those things that one does not see. egan: you have hydrants that were manufactured in the 1800s. you have underground pipes, you have underground valves. they get what they call tuberculin built up. you would compare it to a 100-year-old man that has heavy cholesterol. they could be 6- or 8-inch mains, but being 100 years old, they actually may be 2-inch mains. and they reduce the amount of volume of water that's available to us. johnson: there were a number of things that we have had to do in order to get the system back up to an acceptable standard. replacing mains and valves and fire hydrants and other components of the system to ensure that it operates properly. egan: we consider both the underground infrastructure and the above ground assets to be a part of the critical infrastructure of the city. johnson: and if the infr
distinguished members of the giants ownership group, charles johnson, david jenkins, trina and rob veen, tory and steven humphrey and allen baer. and we also joined by past giants owners. please welcome the family jamie and kim rupert and peter stoneum. also here with us today bob and connie laurie. peter and debbie mc clawlin. bill and sally newco. and now let's give it up for your giants training staff. david, mark and carl, and harold. [cheers and applause] [inaudible] your assistant coaches. shawn dun can, dave stone and the there will will clark. [cheers and applause] . and the manager for the past 54 years the legendary one, mike murphy. [cheers and applause] and we would also like to extend a warm welcome to all of the giants alumni that we have here today including former giants manager feleap laua and five of our hall of famers. gay lord perry, orlando si pirra, jaun, lily misconnie, and willy mays. [cheers and applause] we also want to acknowledge congresswoman nancy pelosi along with her husband. thank you so much for being here. we know how busy you with the election jus
. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so there's a good bit of lobbying through congress to get funding. oberstar: we need to restore the construction grant program. we need to invest substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held c
today is kirk johnson, to my left, vice president of gas transmissions from pacific gas and electric. next to him is don boland, executive director of california utilities emergency association. next to him is david brig, regional and local water system manager for the san francisco public utilities commission and finally but not least, romel an jell lus, manager for san francisco wireless. i have drafted several questions for our panel to answer and will hopefully have time at the end to take questions from the audience. before we start our panel discussion, i wanted it share with you what we are doing in san francisco to advance our lifeline's resilence we are the first major u.s. city to (inaudible) post katrina where he saw firsthand where a critical role these systems played in the city's recovery. i am honored to chair the council because i feel it's crucial that the public sector work side by side with our private sector partners to do everything we can today to ensure we will meet the needs of our residents in the days, weeks and years after a disaster. the objective of t
this conversation, is carol johnson here somewhere? is that they pretty much relate to the breakout groups that we will put you in later. last year i tried a different thing, to apply location, and it did not work at all. we are going back to the way that we did it at all. i am notorious, and bought it -- and will try not to swear up here. obviously, we will be asking you again about your job and what you do daily. i will be asking you to go on to a breakout room. but we want to focus on is what audrey mentioned earlier, the creative content, the experience. we did not call this a safety summit for a reason. we are now moving on. well, patrons' safety is super important. we will be talking about that in the breakout session for security. in that break out section we will hopefully have -- hello. talking about guard cards, we are running around the city telling people they need one and we want you all to know why. we brought the authority on that, and a few other folks, to talk to you about that. i imagine there will be a lot of uniforms in that one as well. that is the breakout for you. again, we
lead by charles johnson. they stepped up to serve as a stalt walt of this franchise and saved it in 1976 and then brought it to san francisco in the first place in 1958. i am proud each owner during the 55 years in san francisco is represented here today. as a fourth generation san franciscan growing up in the richmond district my heroes did wear orange and black. i watched them with my dad and mays and the other players. they're all here today. i knew their story as well as i knew my own because their stories were mine. they were part of my heritage. my parents passed it down to him just as brandon crawford's parents passed it to him and you're passing it your children and pam and i are passing it our children. all my heroes still wear orange and black. there are those on the stage but there are also other people in orange and black. figuratively if not literally. they are the full time employees of this organization and the 1,000 event employees who work hard everyday to make sure the story of the san francisco giants, the world champion san francisco giants is an ex
. you just write a poem about your need to do that a madual johnson. all right. live people. the pins point come downs on the butter fly. the knuckle come down on ms. sisly. the mallet come down on the cd case. wait! the mallet come down on the butter fly. the pins point come down on the ms. sisly. the knuckle come down on the cd case. wait! >> the knuckle come down on the buttir fly. the pins point come down on the cd case. dammit. the butter fly, ms. sisly the cd case. the roses rips at the spit much the phoenix dazzling petals births something. the martir's smile that saves something. what did we make? listen to the butter fly, the pinpoint makes no sound sticking the [inaudible] no brass wail to the air here it's silent as a necktie this is not right. ms. sisly a cd case and a pin striped suit did he stick her lips red. i don't know, i don't know. sometimes he wore a pin striped 3 piece and a dazzling tie. i have a mallet did he kiss her. lips red. did he stick her with a pins point much listen to the brass ware and butter fly the plastic and silence breaks. this is a man thinkin
that made it. >> i would like you to meet michael johnson. he has been in the program for over 8 years. >> nice to me you. what inspired your photography? >> i am inspired everything that i see. the greatest thing about being a photographer is being able to show other people what i see. i have mostly worked in cuba and work that i shot here in san francisco. >> what is it about being a street artist that you particularly like? >> i liked it to the first day that i did it. i like talking to mentum people. talking about art or anything that comes to our minds. there is more visibility than i would see in any store front. this would cost us relatively very little. >> i am so happy to mt
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
was involving the flag-burning case. texas vs. johnson. the other one was by justice kennedy. the other one was by justice roberts very recently in the demonstrations of military fit -- demonstrations at military funerals. they both said the same thing. they said, we don't like what these people did. as a matter of fact, what they did and their beliefs are abhorrent to most americans, and to us personally, but unless we protect their rights, all our rights are in jeopardy. and that is why the concept of a constitutional democracy is so important and must be preserved, but is not understood today. it is not understood by many americans. why? it is not that hard to understand. we live in a democracy. a democracy is supposed to be governed by a majority opinion. so, why isn't the court just governed by whatever the majority of people think? the answer is that that is what is also called mob rule. a constitutional democracy is one that protect everyone's rights, even those who are the minority. that is a concept that was discussed in the federalist papers, which i know we all read when we have
to provide that airlift capability? >> start with mr. johnson. >> yeah, we have some limited capability in terms of aircraft and on site helicopters in our outskirting area, but in terms of a major event in the san francisco bay area, we would be heavily focused on those folks who provide that service to us under contract. we do not have our own helicopters in oakland or san francisco itself, as was already mentioned to, san francisco is very difficult to get to in the case of a major event. it's either going to be getting people in or obviously getting across the bridges and getting material in. while we have the transport ability on the ground we don't have a lot of aircraft capability. most of our facilities wouldn't come in via aircraft anyway. the services we need, it's not typically getting the people, it's getting to the location you need to do the work. while we can drop folks via helicopter, we do that on a pretty regular basis during fires and storms up in the mountains, it's going to be able to get the roads clear and get the bridges open or get access into the location
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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